Speaking recently to celebrate the 10th anniverary and 4K UHD Blu-ray release of Super 8, Collider had the opportunity to chat with director and writer J.J. Abrams, specifically about whether projects should be thoroughly plotted out in advance. While never directly mentioning the Star Wars sequel trilogy that he wrote and directed two chapters of, after initially only planning to be involved in one (and that after some persuasion from Kathleen Kennedy), his words would appear to be relevant to the trilogy.

“I’ve been involved in a number of projects that have been – in most cases, series – that have ideas that begin the thing where you feel like you know where it’s gonna go, and sometimes it’s an actor who comes in, other times it’s a relationship that as-written doesn’t quite work, and things that you think are gonna just be so well-received just crash and burn and other things that you think like, ‘Oh that’s a small moment’ or ‘That’s a one-episode character’ suddenly become a hugely important part of the story. I feel like what I’ve learned as a lesson a few times now, and it’s something that especially in this pandemic year working with writers [has become clear], the lesson is that you have to plan things as best you can, and you always need to be able to respond to the unexpected. And the unexpected can come in all sorts of forms, and I do think that there’s nothing more important than knowing where you’re going.”

Courtesy of Everett Collection

“There are projects that I’ve worked on where we had some ideas but we hadn’t worked through them enough, sometimes we had some ideas but then we weren’t allowed to do them the way we wanted to. I’ve had all sorts of situations where you plan things in a certain way and you suddenly find yourself doing something that’s 180 degrees different, and then sometimes it works really well and you feel like, ‘Wow that really came together,’ and other times you think, ‘Oh my God I can’t believe this is where we are,’ and sometimes when it’s not working out it’s because it’s what you planned, and other times when it’s not working out it’s because you didn’t [have a plan].”

“You just never really know, but having a plan I have learned – in some cases the hard way – is the most critical thing, because otherwise you don’t know what you’re setting up. You don’t know what to emphasize. Because if you don’t know the inevitable of the story, you’re just as good as your last sequence or effect or joke or whatever, but you want to be leading to something inevitable.”

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The Art of Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge
  • Hardcover Book
  • Ratcliffe, Amy (Author)
  • English (Publication Language)
  • 256 Pages - 04/27/2021 (Publication Date) - Abrams (Publisher)