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Anyone glancing at the spectacle of Galaxy’s Edge will have noticed the huge petrified trees that are littered around Black Spire Outpost, and the OC Register take a look at the work that went into making them.

Imagineers wanted to create a historic, exotic and iconic look for the new land that felt instantly recognizable as Star Wars yet still relatable, familiar and approachable on a human and emotional level.

The Matterhorn Bobsleds and Thunder Mountain is seen rising above the tree line as work continues on Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland in Anaheim, CA, on Thursday, August 16, 2018. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

“What is that graphic symbol that says this is Star Wars?” Lucasfilm vice president and creative director Doug Chiang asked. “For us, it was the spires.”

The Galaxy’s Edge spires were inspired by the Petrified Forest National Park in northeastern Arizona near the New Mexico border. Imagineers exaggerated the scale of the petrified trees and turned the frozen forest into a planet-wide ecosystem.

Work continues on the spires high above Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disneyland in Anaheim, CA, on Thursday, August 16, 2018. (Photo by Jeff Gritchen, Orange County Register/SCNG)

“When you do that what happens is that you’re creating something that’s very fresh that is easily identifiable as Star Wars,” Chiang said. “It also makes it very real.”

And why is it called the Black Spire Outpost? That’s a mystery that Disney have set up that has no answer.

“There is a mystery to it and we kind of like that idea that there is no answer to it,” Walt Disney Imagineering managing story editor Margaret Kerrison said. “There is something unusual about it. There’s talk and whispers among the locals about why that thing is blacker than all the rest.”